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Robert Arnold is one of the Canadian researchers for the Vickers Viscount Network and has sent us this information for the Viscount enthusiast -

I received (these) recently into my collection, courtesy my good friend and colleague, Keith Olson. There are times when you figure you have seen or heard of all the Viscount items that might be out there, and then, without warning, more items appear.

In this case the items include; a Viscount Captain's Chair, two Viscount Cabin windows, one emergency exit window, along with a pair of Viscount control wheels.

tmb viscount captain chairAs you can see in the photo, the control wheels were in rough shape, mostly from day to day use while the aircraft they were attached to was in service.

Over the past week I was able to refurbish the First Officer's control wheel to better condition. The Pilot's control wheel will take a fair bit more of an effort to refurbish as it will need some work to bring it back to better shape.

While going through the refurbishing process, I noted the Auto-Pilot disengage buttons were in different locations. The Pilot's disengage button was located on the left control grip, while the First Officer's disengage button was located on the right control grip. With knowing the location of these buttons, I was able to determine I had a proper set of left and right wheels.

The metal framework on the Captain's chair I discovered was still in very good shape, other than some normal wear and tear. The fabric was also in very good shape for its age. While sitting in it for a moment, I found it still rather comfortable. Basically all the chair will need is a good hoovering along with some cleaning and painting of the metal parts. Unfortunately there was no slider-base included (which is a rare find at best). The slider base I already use at home as part of my Vanguard chair, is actually a slider base from a Viscount.

tmb viscount control wheels tmb viscount nose wheel

The Viscount windows, other than being well coated with a thick film of barn dust, are also in very good shape with no cracks or apparent crazing. They too will need a good cleaning.

On a side note, during a recent visit from Al Catteral this past summer, I was inspired to refurbish a nose wheel I already had in my collection. As you can see in the photo it turned out rather well. Note the piece of Viscount carpet under the refurbished wheel.

I hope your readers enjoy the material I have included, and maybe this will trigger a few memories of a time gone by on the Viscount.

Robert W. Arnold,
Vickers Viscount Network, Canadian Researcher,
Winnipeg, Manitoba

The Website: vickersviscount.net

Send all Enquiries to:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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